Resources to support SEND and Developmental Delay

This pages focuses on the Early Years, Childcare and Business Service are building a growing resource directory to help settings support pupils with Special Educational Needs and developmental delay. 

Please be aware that whilst we have uploaded some publications from organisations other than Waltham Forest Council, these are suggested reading and we cannot endorse or be held responsible for the content.

WF Traded Services offers a range of services to support children and young people who are disabled or who have Special Educational Needs (SEN) and their families.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

The National Autistic Society has information and resources on Teaching young children on the autism spectrum. Here you can find information on autism including behaviours to be aware of, challenges autistic children may face, introducing a child on the autistic spectrum to the nursery, adapting the curriculum and training staff.

SENDSuccess also has a range of resources available to support those with autism including information on visual cues, personal reward charts, choosing boards and toilet training. Autism Education Trust helps children and young people with autism to receive an education, enabling them to reach their potential. Here you can find information and resources for early years professionals supporting children with autism as well as a kid zone with videos about autism.

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people perceive the world and interact with others.

Autistic people see, hear and feel the world differently to other people. If you are autistic, you are autistic for life; autism is not an illness or disease and cannot be 'cured'. Often people feel being autistic is a fundamental aspect of their identity.

Autism is a spectrum condition. All autistic people share certain difficulties, but being autistic will affect them in different ways. Some autistic people also have learning disabilities, mental health issues or other conditions, meaning people need different levels of support. All people on the autism spectrum learn and develop. With the right sort of support, all can be helped to live a more fulfilling life of their own choosing.

- National Autistic Society 2018

Down Syndrome 

The Developmental Journal for babies and children with Down syndrome is a tool to help parents and practitioners track and understand development of their child and to share that information with other people particularly professionals. It keeps a record of the child’s individual progress including strengths, achievements and needs. It also helps devise an individual early intervention programme that works for the family and the child.

SENDSuccess have also has a range of resources available to support those with down syndrome on their promoting positive behaviour in pupils with down syndrome page including information on visual guides, social stories, communication passport, feeling cards, frequency charts and ABC charts. 

More information about Down syndrome can be found at Down Syndrome Association with information about early years children at Down Syndrome Association: Growing Up

Down's syndrome, also known as Down syndrome or trisomy 21, is a genetic condition that typically causes some level of learning disability and certain physical characteristics.

Characteristics of Down's syndrome:
Although children with Down's syndrome share some common physical characteristics, they don't all look the same. A child with Down's will look more like their family members than other children who have the syndrome. People with Down's syndrome will also have different personalities and abilities. Everyone born with Down's syndrome will have some degree of learning disability, but this will be different for each person.

Hearing Impairment 

There are different types of hearing loss or hearing impairments: conductive and sensori-neural. These can cause different levels of hearing loss: mild, moderate, severe or profound. More detailed information can be found on SENDSuccess’ page guide to the different kinds of hearing loss.

The National Deaf Childrens Society has an Early Years section with information on how to support a child’s learning who has a hearing impairment in the early years.

SENDSuccess also has a range of resources available to support those with a hearing impairment including information on finding your way around a hearing aid and using radio aids. 

The Deaf Babies and Children Development Journal is a tool to help parents and practitioners track and understand development of their child and to share that information with other people particularly professionals. It keeps a record of the child’s individual progress including strengths, achievements and needs. It also helps devise an individual early intervention programme that works for the family and the child.

Physical Disabilities 

An individual is disabled under the Equality Act 2010 if they have a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long term’ negative effect on their ability to do normal activities

Types of physical disabilities are:

Cerebral palsy

This condition affects muscle tone and movement. Cerebral palsy is caused by a problem in the part of the brain responsible for controlling muscles. The condition can cause muscle stiffness or floppiness, muscle weakness and also uncontrollable muscle movements. The severity of the condition can range from person to person, but it will always have an impact on mobility. More information about Cerebal palsy can be found at United Cerebral Palsy.

Muscular dystrophy

This condition causes a progressive and irreversible weakness in muscles. This can affect a person gradually over time and result in difficulties with movement and breathing. More information about Muscular dystrophy can be found at Muscular Dystrophy UK and Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Spina bifida

This is a birth defect that occurs when the baby’s vertebrae does not form properly around the spinal cord. A person with the condition can experience a range of difficulties. It can cause weakness or total paralysis of the legs, bowel and bladder incontinence and/or learning difficulties. More information about Spina bifida can be found at Shine.

Multiple sclerosis (MS)

This is a disease that affects the nervous system. It is an autoimmune condition that causes the immune system to attack healthy parts of the body, such as the brain or spinal cord. It is a lifelong condition and the symptoms range from person to person. It can cause severe difficulties with vision, movement of the limbs, balance and co-ordination. It can also cause learning difficulties. More information about multiple sclerosis can be found at MS Society and Multiple Sclerosis Trust.

Cystic fibrosis

This is a genetic condition affecting a person from birth. It causes a build-up of thick mucus in the lungs, digestive system and other organs. This causes difficulties with breathing and digestion. More information about cystic fibrosis can be found at Cystic Fibrosis Trust.

DLA funding may be available for the family. If a 3 or 4 year old child is receiving DLA the setting they attend will be eligble for DAF funding. Daf funding can help make adjsutments at the settings

Under the Equality Act, settings must make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to ensure that children (and others) with disabilities are not put at a substantial disadvantage by any policies, practice or physical aspects of your setting. The reasonable adjustments duty includes three key requirements:

  • to make adjustments to any provision, criterion or practice
  • to make alterations to physical features
  • to provide auxiliary aids and services

Scope has information and resources for professionals working with pre-school disabled children. Here you can find information on communication with disabled children, play, story books and practical tips to include children with eating difficulties.

Available Support

DLA funding may be available for the family. If a 3 or 4 year old child is receiving DLA the setting they attend will be eligible for Disability Access Funding (DAF). DAF funding can help make adjustments at the settings

Under the Equality Act, settings must make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to ensure that children (and others) with disabilities are not put at a substantial disadvantage by any policies, practice or physical aspects of your setting. The reasonable adjustments duty includes three key requirements:

  • to make adjustments to any provision, criterion or practice
  • to make alterations to physical features
  • to provide auxiliary aids and services

Speech, Language and Communication 

Communication and language skills are the foundation for children’s learning and key to their life chances. All Talk Communication Project have been commissioned by LBWF to provide a universal service to early year’s settings in Waltham Forest. Their aim is to raise awareness of the importance of good Speech, Language and Communication skills for all young children. More information about the support they provide and resources they have created can be found the The Hub’s All Talk Communication Project Page.

The Communication Trust have various resources to help support your work in the Early Years, including information about children's communication development and how to identify and support children with speech, language and communication needs.

ICAN support practitioners in helping children develop their speech, language and communication skills they need to thrive in a 21st century world. Their vision is a world where all children have the communication skills they need to fulfil their potential. Their mission is to ensure that all children with communication difficulties are identified and supported so that they’re not left out or left behind. ICAN provide information, training and resources.

Language is important because it forms the foundations for interacting with other people for communicating our needs, our thoughts and our experiences. From the moment of birth, babies are ready to communicate: they listen to and look at people and things in their environment, and respond to what they hear and see. Even the youngest babies need a stimulating environment in which those who care for them respond sensitively to the different meanings of their cries, coos and gestures. This early ability to communicate verbally and non-verbally is the basis on which language is developed. A child’s ability to develop language depends on being immersed in a rich environment of words, sounds, rhythm, and verbal and non-verbal expression from birth.’

- Every Child a Talker: Guidance for Early Language Lead Practitioners 2008

Visual Impairment

The Royal National Institute of Blind people have created a range of resources for early years children with visual impairments to enable early years staff and childcare workers to improve their provision.  These resources include information around inclusion of children with sight loss, mobility, massage, sensory development and a play guide.

SENDSuccess also has a range of resources available to support those with a visual  impairment including information on visual impairment healthcare professional, hand-underhand exploration orientation and mobility. 

The Developmental Journal for babies and young children with Visual Impairment is a tool to help parents and practitioners track and understand development of their child and to share that information with other people particularly professionals. It keeps a record of the child’s individual progress including strengths, achievements and needs. It also helps devise an individual early intervention programme that works for the family and the child.

Vision impairment refers to a range of sight problems from mild to severe to total loss of sight. For educational purposes, a child is considered to have a vision impairment if special arrangements are required to enable access to the physical environment or to enable a child to take a full part in the curriculum (the learning activities). Children whose vision is fully corrected by spectacles or contact lenses would not be included in this group.

- Royal National Institute of Blind People 2012

Last update: Tuesday 17th of September 2019 10:45:36 AM